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Newsletters

Tax Alerts

Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


For retired Canadians (and almost certainly for those who are no longer paying a mortgage) the annual income tax bill can represent the single largest expenditure in their budgets. The Canadian tax system provides a number of tax deductions and credits available only to those over the age of 65 (like the age credit) or only to those receiving the kinds of income usually received by retirees (like the pension income credit) to help minimize that tax burden. One of the most valuable of those strategies —  pension income splitting — isn’t particularly familiar to many taxpayers who could benefit from it, especially those who do not receive professional tax planning or tax return preparation advice.


As everyone knows, the Canadian tax system is a complex one, and that complexity is reflected on the annual tax return filed by individual Canadian taxpayers. The T1 Individual Income Tax Return itself is only four pages long, but the information on those four pages is supported by 13 supplementary federal schedules, dealing with everything from the calculation of capital gains to determining required Canada Pension Plan contributions by self-employed taxpayers.


For most Canadians – certainly most Canadians who earn their income through employment – the payment of income tax throughout the year is an automatic and largely invisible process, requiring no particular action on the part of the employee. Federal and provincial income taxes, along with Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions and Employment Insurance (EI) premiums, are deducted from each employee’s income and the amount deposited to an employee’s bank account is the net amount remaining after such taxes, contributions, and premiums are deducted and remitted on the employee’s behalf to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). While no one likes having to pay taxes, having those taxes paid “off the top” in such an automatic way is, relatively speaking, painless.


There’s little likelihood that the average Canadian taxpayer can fail to notice that it is, once again, registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) season, given the number of television, radio, and online RRSP-related advertisements and reminders which invariably appear at this time of year. This year taxpayers must, in order to deduct an RRSP contribution on their income tax return for 2016, make that contribution on or before Wednesday, March 1, 2017. The maximum allowable current year contribution which can be made by any individual taxpayer for 2016 is 18% of that taxpayer’s earned income for the 2015 year, to a statutory maximum of $25,370.